fluency

Wait, what? A written text can be disfluent, too?

I recently read an article entitled, "Disfluency disrupts the confirmation bias" (Hernandez, I., & Preston J. L. (2013). Disfluency disrupts the confirmation bias. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. 49(1), p. 178-182.) which is a rather interesting look at how confirmation bias—the tendency to give greater credibility to evidence that comports with one's already held beliefs—can be dampened by presenting information to people in a disfluent manner. I was interested in the article for obvious reasons (yay, disfluency!) and quickly added it to my Kindle for reading during my next walk to and from campus.  However, I got about one or two pages in before I realized something: The article is not about speech disfluency, but rather text disfluency.

Temporal Variables in First and Second Language Speech and Perception of Fluency

Rose, R. (2015). Temporal Variables in First and Second Language Speech and Perception of Fluency. Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences (ICPhS 2015), p. 0405.1-5. the University of Glasgow: Glasgow, UK.
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